Fun facts on Faculty

Ms. Smith can read and write backwards and is currently pregnant.

Ms. Gustafson used to live in Hawaii when she was a little girl and attended the same high school as Barack Obama (Punahou School) and she also used to be a professional singer before she was a teacher.

Ms. Hurley has 15 cup holders in her Minivan and also used to work at Hobby Lobby fluffing Christmas trees.

Coach Griebel has been a coach at Heritage for the past 31 years and all 3 of this children attended Heritage.

Ms. Libbey collects llamas and also has a huge clown head on the top of her house’s roof

Mr. DeStefano fell in love for the 1st time after reading Romeo and Juliet freshman year. He also lived abroad in South Korea for a year and once he thought he was Martin Luther King Jr. reincarnated.

Mr. McClurg was 6 foot in the 6th grade and has also been to 48 states missing Alaska and Hawaii.

Ms. Hall enjoys singing out loud when she rides her road bike because she feels singing is good for the soul; she also loves dancing and loves giving her students dance pointers before HHS dances.

Coach Rossing loves to run and c0vers over 400 miles in June and July; she also loves hunting, fishing and camping.

Mr. Fischer loves rats because they are smart and friendly. He also dreams about different apocalyptic scenarios usually once every week so that when the apocalypse comes he will  be ready. His favorite kind of jokes are fart jokes but he hates when people fart.

Ms. Cummings was an assistant coach for the girl’s varsity lacrosse team at Arapahoe before she started teaching at Heritage.

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Is Brazil Ready?

Brazil is set to be the host for the 20th FIFA World Cup. This will be the second time Brazil has hosted the fútball championships.

Tickets are already flying off the counters. Anticipation and excitement is in the air and volunteers are working hard in preparation. There are a total of seventeen different stadiums throughout the country for the games. Only six have been completed. The other eleven are in different stages of construction.

There is some apprehension of whether or not the last six stadiums will be completed by June 2014. Will they be ready?

Brazil also has many other dilemmas, such as public transports for the millions of people coming from all over the world.

They must make sure the International airports are prepared, check off the hotels, inns and retreats, and train over 53,000 public safety professionals to ensure that the security plan succeeds.

Millions of fans have been waiting for the past three years for this. Fútball players across the world have been painfully practicing, hoping to win the gold this summer. Is Brazil really ready or are they just putting up a brave front?

Details seem to be rushed and major deadlines have not been met. Brazil needs to realize this is not a high school fútball game, but a world championship. Planning events such as the FIFA World Cup takes an extreme amount of time; time that Brazil has not yet given. Brazil needs to step up to the plate and get their stadiums completed, cities prepared, security trained and transportation organized.

Brazil and its people are looking forward to welcoming faces from across the globe. Many countries have been preparing teams for the next annual World Cup, and many more hard hours of work will be seen throughout the next year to make this an experience the nation will never forget.

 

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Heritage wins the Game

Heritage students rush onto the field Friday night after the Varsity football team wins the game. With a final score of 17-14 Heritage beat Rock Canyon to win the Homecoming game.

Heritage students rush onto the football field Friday night to celebrate with the Varsity team. With a final score of 17-14, Heritage beat Rock Canyon to win the Homecoming game.

Heritage students try to stay warm and dry at the Homecoming game Friday night. Though conditions weren't quite favorable, the student body cheered on their team with enthusiasm.

Heritage students try to stay warm and dry at the Homecoming game Friday night. Though conditions weren’t quite favorable, the student body cheered on their team with enthusiasm.

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JV and Varsity Cheers tried to stay warm during the Homecoming Game Friday night. Even though it was cold and wet, the cheers found ways to enjoy their time at the game.

JV and Varsity Cheers tried to stay warm during the Homecoming Game Friday night. Even though it was cold and wet, the cheers found ways to enjoy their time at the game.

Students bundled up against the rain to cheer on the Varsity football game Friday night. Cold temperatures, rain and wind created a night of rozen toes and fingers.

Students bundled up against the rain to cheer on the Varsity football game Friday night. Cold temperatures, rain and wind created a night of rozen toes and fingers to remember.

At the Homecoming game, Rock Canyon and Heritage players fight or access to the football. Even though they were rivals on the field, the players were respectful and encouraging after the game finished.

At the Homecoming game, Rock Canyon and Heritage players fight for access to the football. Even though they were rivals on the field, the players were respectful and encouraging after the game finished.

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Boys soccer takes control

Through hard work, fast play, and focus, the Varsity Boys Soccer team led by seniors Josh Peil, Luke Ryan, and Conrad d’Leeuwen are determined to work as hard as it takes to do well in playoffs.

“This year I expect that we can make a run in the playoffs and hopefully get back to the state championship game,” says Peil, who has been playing since the age of eight.

The expectations are high, and the intensity is up for this season, especially for these senior captains. Ryan has been playing since age four, and nothing is slowing him down.

“I love the fluidity of the game and how anything can happen. I expect a lot of wins. It may be a rough start, but I think we will improve as the season goes on,” Ryan says.

As for d’Leeuwen, who hasn’t been able to get away from playing since he was five, says
“I love that it’s a team sport, and I expect to do very very well into the playoffs.”

This team does not plan on slowing down until that State Championship game, and they know that if they keep working hard, there is nothing holding them back from being the best in state. Right now, they are 4-3-2 with upcoming games against Castle View on October 1 and Mountain Vista on October 3.

The 2013 Boys Varsity Soccer is fighting for victories to lead them to the playoffs.

The 2013 Boys Varsity Soccer is fighting for victories to lead them to the playoffs.

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Deck out with DECA

DECA club, sponsored by Mrs. Barb Bolen is a club for all students interested in a marketing career. Students get a hands-on experience of working in a functioning store while learning about all the different aspects of marketing. It is a co-curricular club, meaning that all members must be in the marketing class. The DECA students operate and run the DECA Store located in the student center, where they sell school supplies and heritage gear for students.

 

“DECA is a fun class because you get to experience the work environment before high school is over. You learn how a functioning business works and how to be a part of it. I think it’s a great opportunity for kids to learn the lessons of having a job and gaining experience that could help get a job later on,” says Josh Peil ’14.

Besides running the store, DECA students prepare themselves for state, regional, and national DECA competitions. At these high level competitions, students are put in stressful case studies where they must use their experience and knowledge gained to solve the problem.

 

“This club is really like a sport. The high level of competition at state, regionals, and nationals creates a fun and competitive environment for students to expand their marketing skills. This club is for students very interested in a marketing and business career, whether its marketing, sales, or promotions any students with a drive to develop will be successful, and it is a very fun class,” says Bolen.

 

The store is now open in the student center and the students are getting excited for competitions soon to come.

The 2013 Deca club posing for the camera

The 2013 DECA Club is excited for the competition season to start. They are also busy with the school store.

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“North Colorado” proposes problems

Copious rural counties in Colorado will vote in November on whether or not succession is the next step to proclaim their discontent on gun, energy, livestock and oil regulation laws.

Ten Colorado counties including Cheyenne, Kit Carson, Lincoln, Logan, Morgan, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington, Weld and Yuma have agreed to the proposition of succeeding along with two Kansas counties and parts of west Nebraska. If the vote is passed by Congress, then the counties will form the fifty-first state of America called “North Colorado.”

Northeastern Colorado has been planning the succession since June. Supporters started the movement after diverging from democratically enforced laws such as gun control

This map of the Colorado counties that would be a part of “North Colorado” shows the areas wanting succession. These counties will also be joined with parts of west Kansas and west Nebraska.

This map of the Colorado counties that would be a part of “North Colorado” shows the areas wanting succession. These counties will also be joined with parts of west Kansas and west Nebraska.

measures, renewable energy standards in rural areas, the restraint of cruel treatment of livestock and expanded regulation of oil and gas production according to huffingtonpost.com.

“Rural residents are now a disenfranchised minority of Colorado,” says Randy Schafer, Phillips County Administrator.

“We had to do something that would grab Denver’s attention,” says Sean Conway, Weld County Commissioner.

The movement has already made it onto the Cheyenne, Kit Carson, Logan, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington and Yuma Counties’ ballot.

“The vote, however, has been regarded as largely symbolic, since the new state would have to be approved by the state legislature, the governor and Congress,” says huffingtonpost.com.

The succession initiative is supposed to be the positive response to northeastern Colorado’s issues against the government. The vote, taking place in November, will be titled, “Shall the Board of County Commissioners of Weld County, in concert with the county commissioners of other Colorado counties, pursue becoming the 51st state of the United States of America?” according to 7News.

“The way that our political structure is set up gives these communities every right to secede if they receive the required number of votes. Will the 51st state form? It depends on how the people vote. There are various channels that the group will have go through to get to their end goal,” says Ms. Jackie Peach, a Heritage social studies teacher.

The November poll result will undoubtedly cause debate across the country.

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Working While Learning

Heritage has a multitude of students who work at various jobs after school.

Heritage has a multitude of students who work at various jobs after school.

In a student’s seemingly overwhelming and busy life, there are those who tack on an extra obligation to their schedules, like working after school at Old Navy. A study by the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that students with a job during high school gives that student marketable knowledge and skills, good work habits, and the know-how needed for the job world.

These individuals, crazy as they may be, are actually setting themselves up for a better future.  I advocate high school jobs as because they give a student experience in the job world. Whether it be applying for a job or learning how to deal with an unruly customer, high school jobs set a student off a step ahead of those who don’t work during high school.

A student worker also knows that they need to work for what they want. The money that they earn comes from their determination and persistence; money doesn’t show up out of the blue and present itself, it has to be won. I support working in high school because it forces a student to learn to not be lazy and take pride in their work. After all, the quality of something and the work put into it reflects in the reward. A student’s pride in their schoolwork elevates the overall experience in learning and reflects in their grades. The better the grades and the greater the want to learn, the better the entire student body feels and excels.

I also support high school jobs because they are appealing on a resume. Working in high school shows a future employer or university that a student can not only balance their schedule with school work and a job, but also do what it takes to get that “A” and show dignity in their finished products. An appealing resume makes a student more than eligible for attendance at a celebrated college. What America needs now more than ever is a workforce qualified to compete with the rest of the world in any given profession. Going to an esteemed university provides a student with the necessary skills to compete on the global scale. This competitive edge evident at Heritage is what grows the economy and raises the standard of living around the globe.

Working amidst the chaos of high school takes courage and determination. Even working at the local convenience store or a McDonald’s sets a student ahead of the non-working highschoolers and puts them on the path to thrive in the modern job world.

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Heritage alumni flooded out

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On the first night of flooding, Ben Stuvel ’11 and Tyler Fejes ’12 brave the floods, trying to walk up the steps from one of the tunnels that leads up to the CU Boulder campus. Photo Credit: Zach Stults ’11

   As homes were flooded and roads destroyed in early September, Colorado was declared a major disaster zone.

   Heritage alumna Natalie Mathay ‘12 writes a blog and one of her most recent pieces is about her experience with the flood.

   “The place I’ve come to call home, my apartment here in Boulder, my haven after a year of displacement, was invaded by millions of raindrops as aimless as I am, just trying to find where they’re meant to go…The trucks came and were loaded in the standard fashion, women first. Few by few, we climbed into the cabs of the lifted trucks, and by chance I wound up in the pick-up bedecked in camouflage and draped with an American flag,” says Mathay.

   Mathay’s full story is on her blog; it’s titled Hospitality, Holy Water, and Other Flooding Thoughts. It is accessible at http://afrenzyoffollies.blogspot.com/.

   President Barak Obama officially declared Colorado a major disaster area on September 15, 2013. With the declaration, those affected by the floods in Boulder County are now eligible for aid from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

   With FEMA, aid can “include grants for temporary housing and home repairs, low-cost loans to cover uninsured property losses, and other programs to help individuals and business owners recover…,” states the official release document.

   “Luckily I live on the 3rd floor in the middle of the city, but it’s been insane how FEMA and military police are still driving around. Many people have had to relocate,” Sammie Vidal ‘12, Heritage alumna comments.

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Helping the community one school at a time

Leadership students stuff backpakcs for elementary and middle school students. This project was started last spring.

Leadership students stuff backpakcs for elementary and middle school students. This project was started last spring.

The beginning of the school year for the Heritage High School Student Leadership class started off with a challenge of teamwork and organization. The Student Government-based class teamed up with Littleton High School to help deliver school supplies to both middle and high school students in need in the Littleton Public Schools District.

The project was initially started last spring when money was donated by the Student Government members to go toward the service project.

“My favorite part of the project is the fact that we were helping kids who are in our community which makes the project close to home and to the heart,” says Sierra Johnson-Golding ’15.

The community service project, which was headed by Mrs. Kristi Brethauer, involved organizing the school supply lists, shopping for what the students needed and dividing all of the items by school and grade. The project was completed not only in the Leadership class but time was put in by the members on off-hours and outside of school as well.

“This project taught us a lot about organization and communication not only amongst our Student Government but with the representatives as well,” says Abbie Bardales ’14.

With the school supplies delivered, the Heritage Student Government can see the impact of the project on the community.

“We are helping the people who are here and in our lives. I don’t think we can help anyone outside of our world until we try to fix our own problems,” says Johnson-Golding. “And that is exactly what we did when we tried to help kids in our realm.”

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Fun Facts on Faculty

Ms. Smith can read and write backwards and is currently pregnant.

Ms. Gustafson used to live in Hawaii when she was a little girl and attended the same high school as Barack Obama (Punahou School) and she also used to be a professional singer before she was a teacher.

Ms. Hurley has 15 cup holders in her Minivan and also used to work at Hobby Lobby fluffing Christmas trees

Coach Griebel has been a coach at Heritage for the past 31 years and all 3 of this children have attended Heritage

Ms. Libbey collects llamas and also has a huge clown head on the top of her house’s roof

Mr. DeStefano fell in love for the 1st time after reading Romeo and Juliet freshman year, He also lived abroad in South Korea for a year and once he thought he was Martin Luther King Jr. reincarnated.

Mr. McClurg was 6 foot in the 6th grade and has also been to 48 states missing Alaska and Hawaii.

Ms. Hall enjoys singing out loud when she rides her road bike because she feels singing is good for the soul; she also loves dancing and loves giving her students dance pointers before HHS dances.

Coach Rossing loves to run and c0vers over 400 miles in June and July; she also loves hunting, fishing and camping.

Mr. Fischer loves rats because they are smart and friendly. He also dreams about different apocalyptic scenarios usually once every week so that when the apocalypse comes he will  be ready. His favorite kind of jokes are fart jokes but he hates when people fart.

Ms. Cummings was an assistant coach for the girl’s varsity lacrosse team at Arapahoe before she started teaching at Heritage.

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